August 2010

My HR Department Bullies Employees

by Evil HR Lady on August 13, 2010


Bullies, unfortunately, don’t disappear after elementary school. When you run into an entire department devoted to bullying, what do you do?

My HR Department Bullies Employees

Illustration by Chesi – Fotos CC, Flickr cc 2.0

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Why Job Quitters Shouldn’t Aim for Fame

by Evil HR Lady on August 13, 2010

So, I’m quitting. Not everything, just my US News Column. It’s been a good run, but it’s time for me to move on to different things. My last column is, appropriately, on quitters.

Why Job Quitters Shouldn’t Aim for Fame.

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Updated: Please stop sending me emails saying you want to write a guest post for me. I do not accept guest posts. This was a one time exception because Alison had already proven herself as awesome and an expert.

 

This is a first for Evil HR Lady. I’m letting someone else write today’s post. (I know, you are all muttering about “what posts? All she posts now are links to posts. Well, a thousand pardons. Stick around long enough and you get something cool, like this.)

Anyway, Alison Green runs The Ask a Manager Blog where she gives fabulous advice. She asked if she could do a guest post and I said yes, because she’s brilliant. So, here it goes:

I’m ridiculously excited to be guest posting at Evil HR Lady, who was my inspiration for starting my own blog a few years ago. So getting to take over her pulpit for the day feels pretty awesome.

One of the reasons that blogs like this one are so helpful is that so much relating to careers feels mysterious. The rules often don’t seem clear, and yet you’re expected to play by them anyway, which is a recipe for stress and frustration. And when it comes to job searching in particular, the experience can be outright awful — especially in this economy. You’ve got endless application forms, companies that don’t get back to you, and the overwhelming anxiety of the whole experience. What are hiring managers looking for? How can you come across well in the interview? What if you give a silly answer to an interview question? Why aren’t they calling you back?

As a hiring manager, I’ve spent most of my time on the other side of this, and that’s given me a pretty good sense of the spots where most interviewers can improve their game. I also happen to have an oddly compulsive love of sharing that information with job-seekers, in the hope that I can help take some of the anxiety and uncertainty out of the whole process.

Normally I just answer random questions on this topic on my blog as they come in — but now I’ve created a more comprehensive guide to preparing for a job interview, which I’m here to offer to you for free. (Yes, free. Full disclosure: In exchange for giving you the whole thing for free, I’ll put you on my email list so that you’re occasionally notified about other resources I create in the future. But you can unsubscribe at any time if you hate that idea.)

To give you an idea of the sort of advice you’ll find in this free guide, here are a few examples:

* The job description that was included in the initial posting is the key to knowing how to frame your answers and what to emphasize. You can use each line of the job description to figure out how to create the strongest answers. (And make sure to save that job description somewhere at the time that you apply for a job – because the employer may have removed it by the time your interview rolls around.)

* If there’s an interview question that you’re particularly nervous about, a lot of people will just go on being anxious about it and never really come up with a plan for how they’ll handle it if it comes up. That’s not helpful. Instead, you need to face it head-on, decide exactly how you’re going to answer it, and practice the heck out of that answer. Make yourself rehearse your answer out loud over and over and over.

* If you get nervous and worry that you’re not going to come across completely perfectly, think about all the weird/annoying/awkward people you’ve ever worked with. They somehow got hired, and they were probably at least a little weird/annoying/awkward in the interview, right? They’re living, breathing proof that you can be weird/annoying/awkward and still get hired. So when you start panicking that won’t come across as a super-polished all-star, remember these people.

If this kind of thing is helpful to you, you can sign up for the full guide here, and I’ll email a free copy directly to you:

Free Copy of How to Prepare for an Interview: Boost Your Confidence, Impress Your Interviewer, and Get a Job

It’s free, it’s hopefully helpful, and it even comes with a video version in case you don’t feel like reading. Go download it!

Much thanks to Suzanne for letting me hijack this space, and good luck to all of you who are out there job-searching!

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You’re an exempt employee putting in way more than 40 hours a week. So can your employer make you take PTO time if you need to be out of the office for 2 hours? Should they?

I’m Exempt: Can My Employer Deduct PTO for Doctor’s Appointments?

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Why It’s Better to be Underpaid

by Evil HR Lady on August 9, 2010

What you want is to be overpaid. Right? Wrong. What you want is to be underpaid. Here’s why.

Why It’s Better to be Underpaid

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My Boss Fired Me for Sleeping

by Evil HR Lady on August 9, 2010

Dear Evil HR Lady,

I was just curious if you can be fired for having a sleeping disorder that causes mild narcolepsy? I disclosed to my district manager that once I became tired (after a 10-12 hours work shift) it could happen. He was already upset that he heard that I was falling asleep at work. I had explained to him that I was off the clock out of uniform and was sitting in the office chair about to go home and I just leaned back and closed my eyes for a few seconds and an employee thought I was sleeping but I hadn’t been.

Being I was a manager I felt that I would be entitled to just rest my eyes for a few seconds but I guess not. His reply was if I ever was caught sleeping again I would be fired and I wasn’t worried, About two weeks later he came in handed me my last check and said once “I heard you were sleeping on the job during a meeting.” None of which was true and I had no option; he wanted to believe them over me and I feel I was wrongfully fired. It was a few years ago but I feel I’m still entitled to damages!

My Boss Fired Me For Sleeping

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Dear Evil HR Lady,

I lost my job over a year ago. It paid very well and since then I have jumped around to about 4 different jobs trying to find a good fit and reasonable pay. Most of the jobs were beneath my skill level but I needed to earn more than unemployment so I took them. I finally landed an interview with a job that is comparable to my lost job in qualifications and pay, as well as skill level. Should I disclose all my past employers on the new application? Will any be found on a background check if they were less then a few months? In my past I had a very stable job history- worked at a company for over 10 years then the one that laid me off was 2 years. It was only the last year that I did not have stability. Can you offer me any advice as to how to handle this?

Resume Angst: Should I Include Short-Term, Unrelated Positions?

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What do you say about your current company when that company is practicing weird science? How about the truth?

How to Answer Interview Questions About Your Weird Employer

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My Manager is a Failure

by Evil HR Lady on August 3, 2010

Dear Evil HR Lady,

I have a manager, who for 6 quarters, did not deliver on his sales targets. He gets away with it by shifting blame on team members and wrong customer account selection. After missing his first 3 quarters, he blamed it on team and almost got an entirely new team on board. Now with new team he on board, he is still not delivering on his sales targets. Now he blames it on wrong account selection. How can one expose this behavior to senior execs in the business, as this individual has wrecked havoc in other good sales people by managing them out of the company. Any suggestions on how to approach such a situation would be welcomed.

My Manager is a Failure

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Am I Too Fat to Get Hired?

by Evil HR Lady on August 2, 2010

If you’re overweight, does it affect your chances of getting a new job? Of course it shouldn’t, but does it?

Am I Too Fat to Get Hired?

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