December 2011

What to do if you’ve been fired for an ethical violation

by Evil HR Lady on December 30, 2011

Dear Evil HR Lady,

 How do I get past a recruiter who wants to know the truth about why I left my last job?

I spent seven years at a Fortune 500 company. I had a good career there. I was promoted twice and was in my last position for more than two years. I was fired for having an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate. (I hope you appreciate the use of HR jargon there.) I knew that it was wrong, against company policy, and what the consequences would likely be if it were discovered. Ultimately, the relationship was reported to HR and I was fired. Since then, I have gone back to school and just recently earned an MBA.

Now I’ve graduated and I’m back in the job market. I am finding that I can’t get past the recruiter’s screening interview when I tell the truth about why I left my last job. With others, I have led them to the conclusion that I was laid off. (Although I did not actually lie, I did intentionally lead them to the wrong conclusion). Of course I haven’t gotten any of those jobs either. My fear is that companies are able to find out the real reason for my dismissal through an employment verification. I don’t want to lie, but I fear it is my only hope at finding another decent job.

Are recruiters willing to give someone a second chance? Do you have any advice on how to approach this?

To read the answer click here:  What to do if you’ve been fired for an ethical violation

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How to find a job in a distant city

by Evil HR Lady on December 30, 2011

Dear Evil HR Lady,

 I’ve been in HR for about 13 years now (since college). I currently have a stable, decent paying job, but I have decided to move back to the city I grew up in, about 800 miles away.

 My move is scheduled for Spring 2012. I should be able to support myself for about 3 months in order to look for work. Any tips on this? I feel like it would be impossible to find work from so far away, but I’m also scared to make the move and risk not finding a job.

To read the answer click here: How to find a job in a distant city

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Managers: Are you the Kim Jong Il of your company?

by Evil HR Lady on December 20, 2011

With the death of Kim Jong Il comes a ton of news stories about him, including this fabulous one of 17 Bizarre Details About the Dear Leader’s Life. While these stories are wacky and worthy of a dictator, there are many parallels in the lives of managers. Based on these 17 things, here are 5 that pop up in managers.

To keep reading, click here: Managers: Are you the Kim Jong Il of your company?

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How to handle office party embarrassments

by Evil HR Lady on December 19, 2011

A party feels different than the office, so sometimes people forget that anytime they are with people from work, they are at work. If you’re one of those people who “forgot” that you were at work while you were singing karaoke and guzzling punch, you may have a bit more than a hangover in the morning. You may have a boss or coworkers who is displeased with you.

To read more, click here: How to handle office party embarrassments

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Do you know any public sector HR bloggers?

by Evil HR Lady on December 19, 2011

I got this question:

 

I really enjoy reading your articles on CBS Moneywatch, as well as Steve Tobak’s. I worked for a large financial corporation for a decade, so I can identify with the topics and issues you cover. After getting my graduate degree and changing careers to the public sector, for the last several years I have worked for a city government in a job that I love. Although your articles are directed towards the private business side of things, many of them contain advice that can transferred quite easily to the public sector. However, I have noticed major differences in leadership and workplace attitudes in my current job than were present in the private sector, and vice versa. It would be great to find advice articles like yours and Steve’s geared towards working in the public sector. Would you know of any fellow bloggers, consultants or websites that offer advice to public sector workers and management?
I recommended Lisa Rosendahl and Ask a Manager, which isn’t public sector, but she’s a non-profit expert.  Anybody else you all can think of?

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How to avoid a boss that’s bad for you

by Evil HR Lady on December 16, 2011

Making the right decision about who you work for hinges on having your job interview be a two-way conversation

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How to work with a recruiter on LinkedIn

by Evil HR Lady on December 16, 2011

Dear Evil HR Lady,

What is the best way to work with a company’s recruiters? I currently work for a small non-profit, and I have only ever applied for jobs where if the organization had an HR department at all, it was only one or two people, none of whom were “recruiters.”

I am really keen on working for one particular large organization that has a whole “recruitment team” of three or four people! They even have a LinkedIn page for the team. (However, I don’t want to connect via LinkedIn because then my current colleagues could tell that I am job hunting.) How do I make contact with the recruiters? Since all job postings are put online, I’m not sure where these people fit into a job-hunting strategy, but I would love to know. I really have no clue about the rules of engagement in this situation. Any advice?

To read the answer click here: How to work with a recruiter on LinkedIn

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You’re the Boss. Give Yourself a Performance Review

by Evil HR Lady on December 14, 2011

It’s that wonderful performance review time of the year. Make sure you get one–even if you’re the boss. Here’s why:

To find out why click ere: You’re the Boss.  Give Yourself a Performance Review

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9 Worst holiday gifts from bosses

by Evil HR Lady on December 13, 2011

As promised, I used your fabulous stories to write an article about bad gifts from bosses.  You can read the 9 Worst holiday gifts from bosses and laugh all over again.

 

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Your boss does not care about your bills

by Evil HR Lady on December 9, 2011

Dear Evil HR Lady,

 

This summer, I changed jobs, from selling artwork on cruise ships to selling IT managed services. The new company gave me an offer, and (this was my mistake) I accepted it. At the time, it was more money than I made two jobs ago, and while living on the ship, it was hard to calculate what my cruise ship income would translate to on land, so I thought the offer seemed fair. Now that I have rent, groceries, student loans, gas (and personal expenditures like restaurants and entertainment that are more frivolous), I am finding that I am actually making less now than I did at my cruise ship job, and I am starting to panic.

To make matters more confusing, my current pay structure is a base salary with a patch on top to make up for the fact that what I’m selling typically takes a long time to sell. However, starting in three months, that “patch” amount gets reduced by $300, then three months later by another $300. Those numbers will be significant cuts to me.

My company likes to retain its people, and I have already been told by a coworker and boss that my company would rather keep me than have me leave for another job simply to make more money…so I’m a little confused on what to do. Is it too late to mention that I’m realizing just now that I make less now than I used to? Do I wait until they are about to reduce my income patch and say I can’t live with a $300 decrease?

To read the answer click here: Your boss does not care about your bills

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